Thomas D’Innocenzi of Nova Advisors Announces New Asia Global Sourcing Service

Thomas D’Innocenzi of Nova Advisors offers a new Asia Global Sourcing and Business Development service designed to allow small to medium size businesses to compete in the global marketplace at a reasonable cost.

Thomas D’Innocenzi of Nova Advisors Announces New Asia Global Sourcing Service

New York, United States – February 22, 2017 /PressCable/ —

Thomas D’Innocenzi, Founder of Nova Advisors has announced a unique consulting service that allows small and medium size enterprises to compete globally and rapidly grow market share cost effectively. The Global Sourcing and Business Development service will utilize their locations in Asia and the United States along with a very large network of buyers and suppliers that has been developed over 25 years.

“Having built and managed sourcing and business teams for large companies throughout my career, I recognized an opportunity to offering a more streamlined and cost effective service that would allow companies to compete globally where they could not budget for it before” explained Founder and Principal Consultant Thomas D’Innocenzi. “Up until now, the ability to setup a Global Sourcing operation in Asia for low cost contract manufacturing solely belonged to large corporations that had the capital. In addition, the ability to market goods and services into large regions such as Southeast Asia with a population of 700 million solely belonged to large corporations that had the capital. Now, I give small to medium size enterprises the ability to compete in Global Sourcing and Business Development in Southeast Asia, China and beyond with our ability to leverage our network, locations, contacts, and knowledge to quickly gain market share at a much lower cost threshold.”

The Business Development segment of the service in Asia and the US includes rep office creation and management, salesforce development, product regulatory compliance, local legal support, local branding, local advertising, sales and product support, market planning, competitive analysis.

The Global Sourcing segment of the service which addresses the whole Asia-Pacific region includes product specification management, supplier vetting (identification, regulatory compliance, GMP, ISO, QA, QC), backup supplier and risk management, pricing and contract negotiations, commodity tracking, category management, product management, creation and management of local Asian global sourcing offices.

The Southeast Asia location offers US and European customers an immediate local presence when utilizing the new service for either Business Development of Global Sourcing in Asia. The Bangkok-based office has easy reach through SE Asia and China and is very cost effective in operation. Areas serviced from this location include Shanghai, Seoul, Hong Kong, Bangkok, Ho Chi Minh, Vientiane, Kuala Lumpur, Singapore, Manila, Cebu.

The US office location offers Asia-based clients a cost-effective US market entry point for their products or services. We understand the needs of the local Asian culture and the business acumen of US buyers and we create and execute a methodology of closing deals that are mutually beneficial and promotes trade.

About Nova Advisors

Based in Jacksonville, Florida and Bangkok, Thailand, Thomas D’Innocenzi, Founder and Principal Consultant of Nova Advisors helps companies compete globally by offering expert Global Sourcing and Business Development consulting services. Mr. D’Innocenzi has over 30 years of experience in international trade and business development with multinational corporations in the US and Asia. He has worked and lived in several countries in the Asia Pacific region. With locations in the United States and Asia and with a large global network of buyers and suppliers, Mr. D’Innocenzi offers a value-added unique service for customers seeking to effectively expand their market footprint globally while managing risk. More information about the business can be found at http://www.novaadvisors.com. Contact phone numbers are United States: +1.904.307.6414 and Asia: +668.7.800.1015

Contact Info:
Name: Thomas D’Innocenzi
Email: thomas@NovaAdvisors.com
Organization: Nova Advisors
Address: 375 Park Avenue, Suite 2607, New York, NY 10152, United States
Phone: +1-904-307-6414

For more information, please visit http://www.thomasdinnocenzi.com/

Source: PressCable

Release ID: 171641

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Trump is pushing ‘Buy American.’ But customers (mostly) don’t care

  @byHeatherLongMarch 13, 2017: 9:01 AM ET

Cathy Paraggio always checks the labels on stuff she buys: Is it made in China? Vietnam? Bangladesh? Mexico? Or America?

She was a big believer in the “Made in the USA” movement long before President Trump started telling the nation to “Buy American and hire American.”

In 2012, Paraggio launched a male swimsuit brand called NoNetz. It makes swimsuits that prevent chafing and rashes. Paraggio vowed to make the suits in the U.S. She found a textile factory in Brooklyn, MCM Enterprise, that could do the work.

There was just one problem: The suit cost $23 to make in Brooklyn. Making it in China and shipping it to Paraggio’s office cost a mere $10.

Manufacturing in America “makes me look like a bad business person,” Paraggio told CNNMoney. She went with the Brooklyn option anyway. Surely, she thought, customers would prefer to see the “Made in the USA” label.

That’s not what happened.

“No one cares about Made in the USA,” says Paraggio, who recently ordered some suits from China for the first time after Daymond John of Shark Tank gave her frank advice to get real about the bottom line. So she placed the order. And cried.

Trump preaches “Buy American” often. He mentioned it in his Inaugural Address. He brought it up in his first prime-time speech to Congress (watched by over 47 million people). He made it a campaign issue.

But the largest obstacle to Trump’s vision may be the American shopper, who is constantly on the lookout for a good deal.

Related: Rust Belt voters made Trump president. Now they want jobs

Americans care most about price

In survey after survey, Americans say they prefer to buy “Made in the USA” products. But when it comes to actually spending, their choices tell a different story.

“Consumers are all for Made in America until they have to pay for it,” says Greg Portell, partner at consulting firm A.T. Kearney who specializing in advising retailers.

Related: This Michigan toymaker pledged never to go to China

People have grown accustomed to cheap prices after years of shopping at discount retailers like Walmart (WMT) and Target (TGT). In general, they only buy American if it doesn’t cost much more than the product from China or Germany or Bangladesh.

Paraggio saw this trend first-hand in her business. She gets two frequent comments from customers: They love the product, but why does it cost so much?

An Associated Press-GFK poll last year found nearly 75% want to buy American. But their first preference is to buy the cheaper item. The Boston Consulting Group, which has studied the issue for years, found it’s a bit more complicated. When people go to the store, they also consider quality.

Eighty-five percent of U.S. consumers think American-made products are better quality than those made overseas, BCG found. And they are willing to pay a premium for some products that are Made in the USA. For baby formula they’ll pay a lot more. For shoes, they won’t.

“Clothing is one of the things that is very hard to reshore. It’s a tough road to go,” says Hal Sirkin, a senior partner at BCG.

Overall, BCG estimates companies can charge up to about 5% more for American-made.

 

Businesses react to the bottom line

Trump certainly understands this labor math. Some of his own clothing line is made in China.

Chung Yu owns the factory in Brooklyn where Paraggio has been manufacturing the NoNetz swimsuits. He’s been in garment-making for 35 years, but he’s worried about staying in business at a time when New York has raised the minimum wage. It New York City, employers who have a staff of 11 or more, have to pay $11 an hour. That will go up to $15 an hour by the end of 2018.

“In China, it’s $2 or $3 an hour. And even China is getting too expensive. Retailers are switching to countries like Bangladesh,” Yu explains.

Yu’s factory is still pretty busy, but it’s almost all small orders of about 300 items or less. Most of his clients are small businesses like NoNetz. As soon as they hit a certain scale, they typically jump overseas for production.

“People think Made in America is better quality, but that’s not true,” Yu says, frankly. “It all depends on the quality of the machines and labor.”

Yu won’t say who he voted for, but he says thanks to Trump, everyone in his world is talking about “American made” again.

“When we hear how Trump will bring manufacturing back, we’re excited,” Yu told CNNMoney. “But we have to see how he will implement it.”

Chung Yu Brooklyn
Chung Yu owns MCM Enterprise, a clothing manufacturer in Brooklyn.

What could come back to the U.S.

There’s a lot of debate about whether Trump can bring manufacturing, let alone manufacturing jobs, back to the United States. Robots and automation have also taken some (if not a large part — Ball State University says 88% of manufacturing job losses come from automation) of the jobs.

Experts say it’s going to take more than a “buy American” promotional campaign to make it to happen.

The research BCG has done suggests that some industries are more ripe to come back to the U.S. than others. The reality is wages have been rising in China and elsewhere in the world, making it less attractive to make certain products there.

“Computers and appliances are at a tipping point,” Sirkin says. “We’ve seen manufacturing costs overseas go up for those industries.”

Clothing, however, is one of the least likely processes to return, BCG found.

“How could you possibly buy shorts for $5 and have it made here. You absolutely can’t. I’ve tried,” laments Paraggio.

CNNMoney (New York)First published March 13, 2017: 6:25 AM ET
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China’s manufacturing sector expands again in October amid steady economic growth

credited_ap_solar-in-china_news_featured

Manufacturing in China expanded last month, surveys released on Tuesday showed, indicating Beijing has more leeway to focus on safeguarding against asset price bubbles and carry out economic reforms rather than introduce measures to boost the nation’s slowing economy.

China’s official manufacturing purchasing managers’ index, which mainly reflects conditions at state-owned companies, came in much better than analysts expected at a more than two-year high of 51.2 last month, according to the National Bureau of Statistics and the China Federation of Logistics and Purchasing.

A reading above 50 indicates expansion, while one below means contraction.

The previous month’s reading was 50.4.

He said the central bank would keep its current prudent monetary policy unchanged, refraining from further tightening of interest rates or measures to increase money supply.

China’s economy grew at the slowest pace in 25 years last year and the authorities are attempting to shift its growth model away from debt-fuelled development and traditional manufacturing towards the service sector and high-tech industries.

Zhou Hao, a Commerzbank economist, wrote in a research note that the significant improvement in the index was largely driven by rising commodity prices, reflecting massive speculation in China markets.

He noted the overall policy tone has turned less dovish in favour of tighter monetary policy as the economy was improving, but concerns remained over increasing asset bubbles.

More than 20 cities launched measures to curb housing prices early last month. China’s Politburo also held a meeting on October 28, stating preventing asset bubbles was a goal of monetary policy.

Zhao Qinghe, a senior statistician at the bureau, said on its website that the strong expansion was partly due to recovering demand, plus rising industrial prices thanks to Beijing’s efforts to retire obsolete production capacity.

However, he also pointed out that downward pressure remains as new exports orders dropped 0.9 to 49.2 and new imports orders fell to 49.9 from September’s 50.4.

The official purchasing managers’ index outside the manufacturing industry edged up by 0.3 percentage points last month to a high this year of 54, signalling a pickup in growth in the services sector.

The Caixin China General Manufacturing PMI, which is slanted towards smaller privately owned companies, gained to 51.2 in October, the highest since July 2014, from September’s 50.1, according to a separate survey compiled by Markit on Tuesday.

“Beyond that, however, the recovery is likely to stall as the boost from stimulus fades, re-exposing the structural drags that continue to weigh on the economy,” he said.

SOURCE:  South China Morning Post, Tuesday, 01 November, 2016

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Foreigners buying directly from rubber farmers

bangkok-post-102916

**MY RECOMMENDATION:  This may be an opportunity to renegotiate your rubber commodity-based buys to capitalize on lower raw material costs to your suppliers….Tom

While the local rice market is mired in a deep slump due to oversupply, the rubber trade has begun to pick up, with foreign buyers now seeking to buy directly from planters and bypassing the futures market. Foreign…

http://www.bangkokpost.com/business/news/1122281/foreigners-buying-directly-from-rubber-farmers. 

Bangkok Post, October 29, 2016 © Post Publishing PCL. All rights reserved.

 

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