Thai central bank holds rates as economy shows signs of life

A Thai bank employee counts bundles of T

Thailand’s central bank held its key interest rate on Wednesday (Aug 6) as the kingdom’s economy showed signs of revival after an army coup ended months of political protest which rattled consumers, tourists and investors.

The Bank of Thailand kept its policy rate at 2.00 per cent, a level set in March in an effort to boost an economy which shrank 2.1 per cent quarter-on-quarter in the first three months of 2014.

The economy had since shown “signs of improvements … from private spending following the political resolution,” said Paiboon Kittisrikangwan, Secretary of the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC). Explaining the decision, he said the bank expected stronger domestic demand in the second half of the year as “fiscal policy, particularly public investment, should lend further growth recovery” while exports including tourism are also expected to recover, albeit slowly.

It was the bank’s second monetary policy decision since the army toppled a civilian government whose spending plans were hamstrung by months of political turmoil.

Thailand’s army seized power from the elected government on May 22, pledging to galvanise the kingdom’s stuttering economy. It has promised to make swift decisions on much-needed major infrastructure projects and has moved to reassure tourists the kingdom is once again safe to visit after violence linked to the protests claimed nearly 30 lives and wounded hundreds more.

An appointed national assembly will be convened for the first time tomorrow, opening the way for the selection of a new prime minister who will marshall economic policy.

Analysts said the bank’s expected rate hold reflected fragile economic gains since the army power grab. “With the economy still in a delicate state, the Bank of Thailand will be keen to keep rates low,” Capital Economics said in a briefing note. “But as the economy gains a stronger footing in 2015, supported by public spending, we expect the BoT to gradually tighten monetary policy.”

 

 

Source : Channel News Asia | August 6, 2014

Thomas D’Innocenzi

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Thomas D’Innocenzi is a highly accomplished, results-focused international consultant with extensive experience in global sourcing and business development worldwide to meet evolving business needs. Tom has proven ability in implementing and managing profitable global marketing and sourcing operations. He has extensive experience in international business development to accommodate rapid growth. Skilled in building top-performing teams, bench-marking performance, and developing organizations to improve efficiency, productivity, and profitability. Experienced transition leader and change agent. Tom founded Nova Advisors with the mission of providing expert Global Business Development consulting services for companies seeking to expand their market share as an independent consultant. Tom has a network of experts and advisors throughout the Asia-Pacific region and North America. His expertise includes business development, global sourcing, manufacturing, commodities, logistics, QA/QC, FDA, regulatory compliance, sustainability, and supply chain optimization. Tom is experienced in the medical device, apparel, consumer goods and technology services verticals helping companies advance their global sourcing capabilities and develop new markets through a local and sustained approach. Located in SE Asia and the United States, Tom expands market reach to drive sales. His global sourcing strategy includes directly negotiating with commodity suppliers, supply chain networks and distributors for optimal terms based on his expertise and first-hand knowledge of the players. Contact Tom to use his consulting service to increase your global market and make global sourcing profitable for you in the Asia Pacific Region and the United States. http://www.NovaAdvisors.com thomas@NovaAdvisors.com USA Direct: +1.904.479.3600 SINGAPORE: +65.6818.6396 THAILAND: +662.207.9269
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